The bottom of drywall.

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crash1big

Active Member
Premium Member
Nov 24, 2013
154
39
28
56
Illinois
www.brownscarpetcare.com
#1
So the scenario is: A basement that floods often and your called to remediate. It has drywall in it and only the bottom six inches gets affected. What do you normally do?

Normally we tear out the bottom (if needed)t and let the drywaller finish, but; in basements that flood regularly I've been suggesting that the drywall guy install Durock. It doesn't hold water nor is it effected by water, and if the cavity is treated it will withstand mold growth the next time. :)
 

CleanestCarpet

Active Member
Premium Member
#6
So the scenario is: A basement that floods often and your called to remediate. It has drywall in it and only the bottom six inches gets affected. What do you normally do?

Normally we tear out the bottom (if needed)t and let the drywaller finish, but; in basements that flood regularly I've been suggesting that the drywall guy install Durock. It doesn't hold water nor is it effected by water, and if the cavity is treated it will withstand mold growth the next time. :)
That sounds like a good idea. With a recurring flood like that I have suggested to a few home owners that we don't replace the drywall on the bottom. Instead we build out the studs so they are even with the drywall and install taller baseboard. That way next time it happens we take off the base and there is no drywall to rip out. I have done that process twice so far. Some customers don't like the idea of the taller base although.
 

crash1big

Active Member
Premium Member
Nov 24, 2013
154
39
28
56
Illinois
www.brownscarpetcare.com
#7
That sounds like a good idea. With a recurring flood like that I have suggested to a few home owners that we don't replace the drywall on the bottom. Instead we build out the studs so they are even with the drywall and install taller baseboard. That way next time it happens we take off the base and there is no drywall to rip out. I have done that process twice so far. Some customers don't like the idea of the taller base although.
Hey, that's a good idea too. I know what you're saying about the wider base, but if they can save some time , money, and headache next time; why not. :)
 

CleanestCarpet

Active Member
Premium Member
#9
Yes it sure does, but the customer can see that you are looking out for their best interest. Building trust and good relationship will lead to a customer for life, not only for their water loss, but cleaning their carpet, furniture, rentals, ect. Not to mention some great word of mouth.
 

crash1big

Active Member
Premium Member
Nov 24, 2013
154
39
28
56
Illinois
www.brownscarpetcare.com
#10
Yes but doesn't this cost you money in the end from less work on the next flood they have?
Probably but ; it's drywall. I hate drywall. I'd rather not do the drywall and just make the money on the equipment. Plus it's only the bottom 6 in. The toughest part to replace. :)
 

CleanestCarpet

Active Member
Premium Member
#11
Probably but ; it's drywall. I hate drywall. I'd rather not do the drywall and just make the money on the equipment. Plus it's only the bottom 6 in. The toughest part to replace. :)
Exactly, a huge time saver and you still do well on equipment rental.
 

aspenedelen

Top Contributor
Staff member
Moderator
Nov 24, 2013
591
150
43
South Dakota
www.louiescarpetcleaning.com
#12
What I've done is recommend the client put in tile on the floor (goodbye carpet or vinyl) and install a six in high cove base. This way if and when the basement floods you remove the base, dry out the wall cavity and you are done. Since the tile is porous it will dry with lgr dehumidification very nicely without cracking or shrinkage. Once dried, either replace the old cove base or else replace with new and you are done. Easy peasy as my three year old says.
 

CleanestCarpet

Active Member
Premium Member
#13
What I've done is recommend the client put in tile on the floor (goodbye carpet or vinyl) and install a six in high cove base. This way if and when the basement floods you remove the base, dry out the wall cavity and you are done. Since the tile is porous it will dry with lgr dehumidification very nicely without cracking or shrinkage. Once dried, either replace the old cove base or else replace with new and you are done. Easy peasy as my three year old says.
After seeing what I've seen, I will never have carpet in a basement.
 

aspenedelen

Top Contributor
Staff member
Moderator
Nov 24, 2013
591
150
43
South Dakota
www.louiescarpetcleaning.com
#15
I like the idea of building that trust with the client. You will save them money but as long as they trust you, they will come back to you repeatedly. Build a business, not just a job.
That is the only way to go. If the client trusts you explicitly knowing you are fair and professional they will never need to find someone else.
 

Ally555

New Member
Dec 11, 2014
10
1
3
33
#16
In the event that the water originates from a clean source, drying equipment can be used in conjunction with various restoration techniques to effectively save the drywall and avoid subsequent expensive repair costs. This will benefit both the property owner and their insurance provider.